Posts Tagged: bishop elizabeth

Springboards, Straightjackets, and Writing from Life

Let’s talk about the herd of woolly mammoths in the room: How much of what poets and novelists write is (thinly) veiled real life stuff? Isn’t poetry supposed to be ‘real’?

Springboards, Straightjackets, and Writing from Life

Let’s talk about the herd of woolly mammoths in the room: How much of what poets and novelists write is (thinly) veiled real life stuff? Isn’t poetry supposed to be ‘real’?

The Biography of a Poetry (Goldensohn / Bishop)

Goldensohn, Lorrie. Elizabeth Bishop: The Biography of a Poetry. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992. Print.  Rather than writing a biography of Elizabeth Bishop, Lorrie Goldensohn sets out to trace the development of Bishop’s poetry. This may sound technical, but

The Biography of a Poetry (Goldensohn / Bishop)

Goldensohn, Lorrie. Elizabeth Bishop: The Biography of a Poetry. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992. Print.  Rather than writing a biography of Elizabeth Bishop, Lorrie Goldensohn sets out to trace the development of Bishop’s poetry. This may sound technical, but

Elizabeth Bishop: Secondary Sources

A little write-up (in the spirit of a personal annotated bibliography) of some secondary sources I looked at regarding Elizabeth Bishop. One of them isn’t really actually secondary, since it’s an interview with Bishop herself, but since it’s neither her prose

Elizabeth Bishop: Secondary Sources

A little write-up (in the spirit of a personal annotated bibliography) of some secondary sources I looked at regarding Elizabeth Bishop. One of them isn’t really actually secondary, since it’s an interview with Bishop herself, but since it’s neither her prose

To All Appearances (Josephine Miles)

I stumbled across Josephine Miles when I was writing a paper about Elizabeth Bishop and her use of adjectives. Miles wrote the book Major Adjectives in English Poetry — from Wyatt to Auden (1946). The book is impressive, and must have

To All Appearances (Josephine Miles)

I stumbled across Josephine Miles when I was writing a paper about Elizabeth Bishop and her use of adjectives. Miles wrote the book Major Adjectives in English Poetry — from Wyatt to Auden (1946). The book is impressive, and must have

Elizabeth Bishop: Life & the Memory of It (2)

I finished reading Millier’s Elizabeth Bishop biography last night. I wanted to finish it before my birthday, and I did. So, after over 500 pages, what do I know about Bishop? Lots. Some things I’m not sure were necessary for

Elizabeth Bishop: Life & the Memory of It (2)

I finished reading Millier’s Elizabeth Bishop biography last night. I wanted to finish it before my birthday, and I did. So, after over 500 pages, what do I know about Bishop? Lots. Some things I’m not sure were necessary for

Elizabeth Bishop: Life and the Memory of It

Brett C. Millier’s biography of of Elizabeth Bishop is very readable and clearly structured in chronological sections. I’ve made it up to 1947 so far, about 200 pages into the 600 of this tome. Millier tries to follow Bishop’s emotional

Elizabeth Bishop: Life and the Memory of It

Brett C. Millier’s biography of of Elizabeth Bishop is very readable and clearly structured in chronological sections. I’ve made it up to 1947 so far, about 200 pages into the 600 of this tome. Millier tries to follow Bishop’s emotional

Elizabeth Bishop (9): Stories and Memoirs

These past ten days or so I’ve been meaning to read (and then write about) Bishop’s prose. After reading much of the first section (Stories and Memoirs) of the prose volume of the collected works, I have some thoughts to

Elizabeth Bishop (9): Stories and Memoirs

These past ten days or so I’ve been meaning to read (and then write about) Bishop’s prose. After reading much of the first section (Stories and Memoirs) of the prose volume of the collected works, I have some thoughts to

Elizabeth Bishop (8): Translations from the Portuguese / Uncollected Translations.

Translations are peculiar creatures. Especially when it comes to poetry. Think about it — much of the work poetry does relies on associations, some more loosely connected to a word than others, and on the type of melody and pattern

Elizabeth Bishop (8): Translations from the Portuguese / Uncollected Translations.

Translations are peculiar creatures. Especially when it comes to poetry. Think about it — much of the work poetry does relies on associations, some more loosely connected to a word than others, and on the type of melody and pattern

Elizabeth Bishop (7): Unpublished Manuscript Poems

So I’ve reached the end of the poems — and it feels like looking over someone’s desk while they just popped out for a sec. The FSG Poems includes images of the handwritten and typed drafts Bishop left behind, complete with

Elizabeth Bishop (7): Unpublished Manuscript Poems

So I’ve reached the end of the poems — and it feels like looking over someone’s desk while they just popped out for a sec. The FSG Poems includes images of the handwritten and typed drafts Bishop left behind, complete with

A wasps' nest (early stages)

Elizabeth Bishop (6): New and Collected Poems (1978-1979)

Getting near the end of the big volume of Bishop’s complete poems. The opening poem here is “Santarem” — another poem set in Brazil — and it’s just lovely. Bishop’s speaker remembers an episode from visiting Santarem, admitting that there

A wasps' nest (early stages)

Elizabeth Bishop (6): New and Collected Poems (1978-1979)

Getting near the end of the big volume of Bishop’s complete poems. The opening poem here is “Santarem” — another poem set in Brazil — and it’s just lovely. Bishop’s speaker remembers an episode from visiting Santarem, admitting that there

Elizabeth Bishop (5): Geography III (1976)

Geography III is the first book of Bishop’s I ever read from cover to cover, for an undergrad poetry class almost ten years ago. I remember discussing “Crusoe in England” in class and finding it more interesting than Robinson’s story

Elizabeth Bishop (5): Geography III (1976)

Geography III is the first book of Bishop’s I ever read from cover to cover, for an undergrad poetry class almost ten years ago. I remember discussing “Crusoe in England” in class and finding it more interesting than Robinson’s story

Elizabeth Bishop (4): New and Uncollected Works (1969)

The first text in this collection is a set of monologues: the speakers are a giant toad, a strayed crab, and finally a giant snail. The toad’s voice is intensely interesting; from the first line where we are asked to

Elizabeth Bishop (4): New and Uncollected Works (1969)

The first text in this collection is a set of monologues: the speakers are a giant toad, a strayed crab, and finally a giant snail. The toad’s voice is intensely interesting; from the first line where we are asked to