Posts Tagged: Black Literature

James Weldon Johnson’s Ex-Colored Man

I’m not sure where this little book came from / how it ended up on my shelf, but I’m glad it did. This somewhat abridged version of James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (first published in 1912) was made

James Weldon Johnson’s Ex-Colored Man

I’m not sure where this little book came from / how it ended up on my shelf, but I’m glad it did. This somewhat abridged version of James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (first published in 1912) was made

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.3): Winona

This is part 3 of a series of 3 blog posts about Pauline Hopkins’ Magazine Novels. Part 1 discusses Of One Blood, part 2 is about Hagar’s Daughter. Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is the shortest

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.3): Winona

This is part 3 of a series of 3 blog posts about Pauline Hopkins’ Magazine Novels. Part 1 discusses Of One Blood, part 2 is about Hagar’s Daughter. Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is the shortest

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.2): Hagar’s Daughter

Post 2 of 3 on Pauline Hopkins’ magazine novels. Post 1, about Of One Blood, is here. Post 3, about Winona, is here. Hagar’s Daughter has two distinct parts, with the first part taking place shortly before the Civil War, and

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.2): Hagar’s Daughter

Post 2 of 3 on Pauline Hopkins’ magazine novels. Post 1, about Of One Blood, is here. Post 3, about Winona, is here. Hagar’s Daughter has two distinct parts, with the first part taking place shortly before the Civil War, and

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.1), Of One Blood, or: Fiction for Betterment

This is post 1 of 3 about The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins  (The Schomburg Library of Nineteenth-Century Black Women Writers, Oxford University Press).

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.1), Of One Blood, or: Fiction for Betterment

This is post 1 of 3 about The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins  (The Schomburg Library of Nineteenth-Century Black Women Writers, Oxford University Press).

George S. Schuyler’s “Black No More” (1931)

During my preparation for my exam on modernism, I also read a few things about the Harlem Renaissance, and it was in one of those that I came across a mention of Black No More by George S. Schuyler. The two-sentence summary

George S. Schuyler’s “Black No More” (1931)

During my preparation for my exam on modernism, I also read a few things about the Harlem Renaissance, and it was in one of those that I came across a mention of Black No More by George S. Schuyler. The two-sentence summary

Dear Darkness (Kevin Young): Odes to Okra, Chitlins and Grits

I just finished Kevin Young’s Dear Darkness, a relatively long collection of poems (almost 200 pages!) and very enjoyable. I’m glad I got to read it here and now, that is, in Mississippi, and during the monsoon-like rain that rings in

Dear Darkness (Kevin Young): Odes to Okra, Chitlins and Grits

I just finished Kevin Young’s Dear Darkness, a relatively long collection of poems (almost 200 pages!) and very enjoyable. I’m glad I got to read it here and now, that is, in Mississippi, and during the monsoon-like rain that rings in

He is Fat and Fine / Chocolate Girl Ballads (Gwendolyn Brooks)

I’ve been reading The World of Gwendolyn Brooks, a 1971 collection of Brooks’ poems and fiction. There are some favorites, but mostly lots of favorite turns of phrases, interesting and original descriptions. Even if you’re not big into poetry, you may

He is Fat and Fine / Chocolate Girl Ballads (Gwendolyn Brooks)

I’ve been reading The World of Gwendolyn Brooks, a 1971 collection of Brooks’ poems and fiction. There are some favorites, but mostly lots of favorite turns of phrases, interesting and original descriptions. Even if you’re not big into poetry, you may