Posts Tagged: latino

Wonder Woman and Mango Street

I may have spent the past couple of weeks traveling, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been reading, so here’s what I’d like to share with y’all today:   Two very different books — The Secret History of Wonder Woman,

Wonder Woman and Mango Street

I may have spent the past couple of weeks traveling, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been reading, so here’s what I’d like to share with y’all today:   Two very different books — The Secret History of Wonder Woman,

Make me Born: We The Animals, by Justin Torres

Justin Torres’s We The Animals is a slender volume and a perfect example of quality being unrelated to quantity. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this (his first) novel, and a reviewer’s comment that the book feels like a sets of old school

Make me Born: We The Animals, by Justin Torres

Justin Torres’s We The Animals is a slender volume and a perfect example of quality being unrelated to quantity. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this (his first) novel, and a reviewer’s comment that the book feels like a sets of old school

Imagine the Angels of Bread (Martin Espada): Not All Aliens are on Star Trek

Martin Espada’s Imagine the Angels of Bread is a collection of poem that speaks out on behalf of the ‘alien,’ the illegal immigrant who is used and abused. An example: In “Offering to an Ulcerated God,” a woman who does not

Imagine the Angels of Bread (Martin Espada): Not All Aliens are on Star Trek

Martin Espada’s Imagine the Angels of Bread is a collection of poem that speaks out on behalf of the ‘alien,’ the illegal immigrant who is used and abused. An example: In “Offering to an Ulcerated God,” a woman who does not

Growing up in Spanish Harlem: Ernesto Quinonez’ “Bodega Dreams”

The third Latino novel I’m going to talk about is quite different from both of the other two (Dreaming in Cuban, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents). Unlike the protagonists of the other novels, Chino has spent all his

Growing up in Spanish Harlem: Ernesto Quinonez’ “Bodega Dreams”

The third Latino novel I’m going to talk about is quite different from both of the other two (Dreaming in Cuban, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents). Unlike the protagonists of the other novels, Chino has spent all his

Dreaming in Cuban (by Cristina Garcia)

Dreaming in Cuban is very different from the last novel I discussed here,  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. It feels like there is, somehow, more of everything. It’s rougher throughout, but smoother around the edges. Maybe this will make

Dreaming in Cuban (by Cristina Garcia)

Dreaming in Cuban is very different from the last novel I discussed here,  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. It feels like there is, somehow, more of everything. It’s rougher throughout, but smoother around the edges. Maybe this will make

Julia Alvarez: How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents

This is one of the texts we’ll be reading in the Latino Literature class I’m taking this fall. Since there’s a lot of reading and I’ll have my hands full from next week until Christmas, pretty much literally, I thought

Julia Alvarez: How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents

This is one of the texts we’ll be reading in the Latino Literature class I’m taking this fall. Since there’s a lot of reading and I’ll have my hands full from next week until Christmas, pretty much literally, I thought