Posts Tagged: the South

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.3): Winona

This is part 3 of a series of 3 blog posts about Pauline Hopkins’ Magazine Novels. Part 1 discusses Of One Blood, part 2 is about Hagar’s Daughter. Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is the shortest

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.3): Winona

This is part 3 of a series of 3 blog posts about Pauline Hopkins’ Magazine Novels. Part 1 discusses Of One Blood, part 2 is about Hagar’s Daughter. Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is the shortest

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.2): Hagar’s Daughter

Post 2 of 3 on Pauline Hopkins’ magazine novels. Post 1, about Of One Blood, is here. Post 3, about Winona, is here. Hagar’s Daughter has two distinct parts, with the first part taking place shortly before the Civil War, and

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.2): Hagar’s Daughter

Post 2 of 3 on Pauline Hopkins’ magazine novels. Post 1, about Of One Blood, is here. Post 3, about Winona, is here. Hagar’s Daughter has two distinct parts, with the first part taking place shortly before the Civil War, and

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.1), Of One Blood, or: Fiction for Betterment

This is post 1 of 3 about The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins  (The Schomburg Library of Nineteenth-Century Black Women Writers, Oxford University Press).

The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins (pt.1), Of One Blood, or: Fiction for Betterment

This is post 1 of 3 about The Magazine Novels of Pauline Hopkins  (The Schomburg Library of Nineteenth-Century Black Women Writers, Oxford University Press).

Hush Hush, by Steven Barthelme

I am not a little adult. I am ten. I am a child and I expect to be treated as a child […] I expect to be bought ice cream cones and talked to stupid and left alone. […] Many

Hush Hush, by Steven Barthelme

I am not a little adult. I am ten. I am a child and I expect to be treated as a child […] I expect to be bought ice cream cones and talked to stupid and left alone. […] Many

Dollar Bills, Blood, and Bras : Denise Duhamel’s “Ka-ching!”

After reading Duhamel’s Blowout, I wanted to read another collection of hers, to see more of her work, and it turned out that Ka-ching! was a good choice because it’s so different from the former. Yes, the poems are still very much

Dollar Bills, Blood, and Bras : Denise Duhamel’s “Ka-ching!”

After reading Duhamel’s Blowout, I wanted to read another collection of hers, to see more of her work, and it turned out that Ka-ching! was a good choice because it’s so different from the former. Yes, the poems are still very much

Blowout (Denise Duhamel)

In workshop we’ve been talking about manuscript titles (and how to choose one), and I think Denise Duhamel’s Blowout is well-titled. This is a blowout: The uncontrolled release of a substance (like crude oil — or, in this case, powerful

Blowout (Denise Duhamel)

In workshop we’ve been talking about manuscript titles (and how to choose one), and I think Denise Duhamel’s Blowout is well-titled. This is a blowout: The uncontrolled release of a substance (like crude oil — or, in this case, powerful

Dear Darkness (Kevin Young): Odes to Okra, Chitlins and Grits

I just finished Kevin Young’s Dear Darkness, a relatively long collection of poems (almost 200 pages!) and very enjoyable. I’m glad I got to read it here and now, that is, in Mississippi, and during the monsoon-like rain that rings in

Dear Darkness (Kevin Young): Odes to Okra, Chitlins and Grits

I just finished Kevin Young’s Dear Darkness, a relatively long collection of poems (almost 200 pages!) and very enjoyable. I’m glad I got to read it here and now, that is, in Mississippi, and during the monsoon-like rain that rings in

Lessons in Cynicism and Faith: Flannery O’Connor’s Short Fiction

So, about Miss Flannery O’Connor. Born in 1925 in Georgia, she suffered with lupus for a long time and finally succumbed to it at age 39. She wrote novels as well as short stories and essays. Thanks to the USM

Lessons in Cynicism and Faith: Flannery O’Connor’s Short Fiction

So, about Miss Flannery O’Connor. Born in 1925 in Georgia, she suffered with lupus for a long time and finally succumbed to it at age 39. She wrote novels as well as short stories and essays. Thanks to the USM

Life in Mississippi: A Curtain of Green (Eudora Welty)

Eudora Welty’s Curtain of Green (1941) was the first collection of short stories she published. Its introduction, by Katherine Anne Porter (author of Pale Horse, Pale Rider among others), is full of praise for the emerging writer and especially for her command

Life in Mississippi: A Curtain of Green (Eudora Welty)

Eudora Welty’s Curtain of Green (1941) was the first collection of short stories she published. Its introduction, by Katherine Anne Porter (author of Pale Horse, Pale Rider among others), is full of praise for the emerging writer and especially for her command

sarsaparilla and jimson weed (the sound and the fury, faulkner)

i borrowed this one from my dad’s library. it actually is less creased than this picture. i’m a careful reader. 🙂  at first glance i was discouraged simply by the cover of this book. it is so bleak, communicates so

sarsaparilla and jimson weed (the sound and the fury, faulkner)

i borrowed this one from my dad’s library. it actually is less creased than this picture. i’m a careful reader. 🙂  at first glance i was discouraged simply by the cover of this book. it is so bleak, communicates so

pale horse, pale rider (porter)

i have to admit i had never heard of porter before a friend recommended “pale horse, pale rider” to me. the book contains three short stories (or, novels as the author preferred to call them, detesting the word “novella”): old

pale horse, pale rider (porter)

i have to admit i had never heard of porter before a friend recommended “pale horse, pale rider” to me. the book contains three short stories (or, novels as the author preferred to call them, detesting the word “novella”): old

the vulgarity of man: geronimo rex (barry hannah)

i don’t like blurbs or big praise actually printed on the book, or in the book as an introduction, but the NYT quote on the front cover is quite appropriate really: “A stunning piece of entertainment … vulgar, ribald, and

the vulgarity of man: geronimo rex (barry hannah)

i don’t like blurbs or big praise actually printed on the book, or in the book as an introduction, but the NYT quote on the front cover is quite appropriate really: “A stunning piece of entertainment … vulgar, ribald, and